Library

Book of the Year

Banned Book Participants "First Memory of Reading a Book"

  1. a Mickey Mouse version of a Christmas Carol
  2. I was younger and I tried to read a doctor Suess book
  3. is when I went to the library and got my first library card and checked out my first book
  4. I read the Everybody Poops book with my mother
  5. I think I had a picture dictionary as a very young child my grandmother taught me to read when I was 4.
  6. I remember reading a "Dick and Jane" type of book with her.
  7. I remember learning to read with those easy read books.
  8. It was about a buttercup fairy my first memory of reading is with my sister helping me catch up my reading skills.
  9. Books were Clifford "The Big Red Dog" and Dr. Seuss "Green Eggs and Ham"
  10. I can not remember my first book, but all my books are a part of me I was so excited when I could read "Call of the Wild" by Jack London, from my father's bookshelf!
  11. reading Dr. Suess books and building houses from them; listening to my dad read to me from Dr. Seuss and telling him when he got the inflection wrong
  12. my grandma bought me a series of Curious George books and read them with me
  13. Rotten Island by William Steig
  14. George and Martha
  15. reading "Are you my mommy?" with mum
  16. my first memory of reading a book is reading Goodnight Moon and Where the Wild Things Are
  17. my parents always read me bed time stories snuggling under my blanket with dragons and knights
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Sherman Alexie Podcast

Sherman Alexie has a podcast with author Jess Walters. The blog, A Tiny Sense of Accomplishment, is based on a friendship based on "the state of the world to the projects they’re working on to the real important stuff, like professional basketball." Podcast topics cover many areas of interest, including readings from each author. You can subscribe via iTunes.

Thanks Pimm for sharing this new way to hear Sherman Alexie talk about his idea.s

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HSU Students, Faculty, and Staff know it is important to read banned books

These are the answers from HSU students, faculty and staff who participated in the Banned Book Read-Out when asked the question: "Why is it important to read banned books?"

 

Why is it important to read banned books?

 

it's important to read all books; knowledge = power
to learn cultural and societal values that went against the power of the day
expand your kind, read all books, especially the banned ones
they've got the best material!
it's important to read…period. We shouldn't suppress thought or the written word
because our written stories are all that will be left of us someday, history isn't subjective
because no one person or group of people should be allowed to restrict the uncomfortable, inconvenient or revealing speech of another
educate and learn from experiences that may be uncomfortable so that we can make educated decisions ourselves
just because
tell truth

 

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And the winners are ...

Congratulations to Peter Mueller and Harriet Ann Burr who both won copies of Sherman Alexie's "War Dances" by participating in the Banned Book Read-Out today.

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Celebrate Your Freedom to Read

Stop by the Library Lobby today between noon and 2 p.m. to hear people from the HSU Community read from their favorite banned or challenged books.

Enter to win a copy of Book of the Year "War Dances" by Sherman Alexie.

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Banned Book assigned for class reading at HSU

Thank you to Maria Corral-Ribordy for pointing out that one of the top 10 books that were challenged during 2013, Bless Me Ultima, by Rudolfo Anaya, is a required book for Ethnic Studies 107: Chican@ Latin@ Lives class.

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Bill Moyers on Banned Books Week

On the 30th Anniversary of Banned Books Week, Bill Moyers presented 3 minutes of why censorship is the biggest enemy of truth.

Check out the video on vimeo.

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Banned Book by Book of the Year author Sherman Alexie

Have you read any books by Book of the Year author Sherman Alexie? Did you know that his book "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" has been challenged and banned from classrooms at more than one school? The book, which won the National Book Award for Young People's Literature in 2007, is available from the HSU Library in the Children's Literature Collection on the 2nd floor.

Interested in reading more about the challenge to Sherman Alexie's novel?

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Tune in to KHSU today at 1 p.m.

Marcy Burstiner and Kumi Watanabe-Schock will be on KHSU's Homepage this afternoon.  The program starts at 1pm, and the interview will start around 1:10pm.  You can listen live  or listen later from KHSU Audio Archives.

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Have you Signed Up to Read at the Banned Books Read-Out?

Some of the banned and challenged books and poems that will be read at the Banned Books Read-Out:

  • Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling
  • Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
  • Beloved by Toni Morrison
  • Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
  • Howl for Carl Solomon by Allen Ginsberg
  • Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein

What book do you want to share? See ALA's list of frequently challenged books:http://www.ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/top10

The Read-Out will take place on September 23rd, 2014 in the Library's lobby between 12:00pm and 2:00pm. Register online to guarantee your space to read.

Part of the national Banned Books Week sponsored by the American Libbrary Association .

 

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